Nintendo of America Launches the Nintendo Treehouse Log

Nintendo has always been known to be a highly secretive company, and rightly so, as they have successfully created some of the most iconic experiences and franchises that we know to this day. Of course, over time those same ideas have fallen prey to “copycatting” and blatant malicious intentions on some people’s parts. However, over the past several years, the company as a whole has begun to scale back the shroud slightly, here and there. From the occasional Nintendo Direct presentation to the Nintendo Treehouse: Live presentations, fans have been able to share in the joy of getting to know just a bit more about the company they love.

Now, the curtain has been pulled back just a bit more by the Nintendo of America arm of the company by launching an ongoing blog on Tumblr called the Nintendo Treehouse Log. This blog will serve as another way in which the company will be able to communicate with its fans more frequently.

tumblr_inline_omexle86hu1uftrnv_1280The first two posts are from Bill Trinen and Nate Bihldorff, respectively, and they both serve to illustrate the nature of what the blog will likely develop into going forward. I know that there are other game developers who maintain blogs, as well (like PlatinumGames, for one), so I am very hopeful that the Nintendo Treehouse Log will offer up tremendous amounts of information in the near and distant future.

Over the last several years, we’ve continued looking for new ways to communicate with Nintendo fans and get them the product knowledge and insight that Treehouse staff are uniquely positioned to share. What we’ve seen from Nintendo Treehouse: Live is that there is a hunger for deeper details from people who know and love the games. Sometimes it makes sense for that information to come in the form of a Nintendo Treehouse: Live broadcast, but what we’re finding is that there is more to share over the course of the year, and it may not always make sense to do it in a live stream. That’s where the Nintendo Treehouse Log comes in.

One of the great tidbits of information thattumblr_inline_on6fulrq0l1uftrnv_1280 we were able to get early-on, here from the blog, is how much of the start for the localization team happens. Nate shares his experience with the very first game that he helped to localize in his Nintendo Treehouse career, Paper Mario on the Nintendo 64.

That’s a microcosm of how we start with every game. Sometimes it begins years in advance, when we meet with dev teams to review artwork or game concepts, sometimes it begins when we see a near-finished Japanese product, but no matter when we get in the pool, the core tenet of our process remains unchanged—we need to first understand the game and the developer’s vision before we do anything else.

I am really looking forward to what we will be getting from the staff as they post to the Nintendo Treehouse Log going forward. It will be really interesting to read, and hopefully learn new things often. With the effort that Nintendo continues to put forth to make sure the experiences that fans are having with regards to their IP, it is a testament to the amount of care that Nintendo has for their fans, and I believe it will continue to show, the more they do things like this. I know I certainly plan to share the contents from the blog quite frequently (or as much as it is updated).

What type of things do you hope to see from the Nintendo Treehouse Log? Do you think this will become a major part of Nintendo of America’s strategy for communicating with fans? Will you be reading often?

As always, gaming is meant to be fun, so keep gaming!!

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